Spectral constraints on the redshift of the optical counterpart to the γ-ray burst of 8 May 1997

@article{Metzger1997SpectralCO,
  title={Spectral constraints on the redshift of the optical counterpart to the $\gamma$-ray burst of 8 May 1997},
  author={Mark Robert Metzger and S. George Djorgovski and Shrinivas R. Kulkarni and Charles C. Steidel and Kurt L. Adelberger and Dale A. Frail and Enrico Costa and Filippo Frontera},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1997},
  volume={387},
  pages={878-880}
}
Brief, intense bursts of γ-rays occur approximately daily from random directions in space, but their origin has remained unknown since their initial detection almost 25 years ago. Arguments based on their observed isotropy and apparent brightness distribution are not sufficient to constrain the location of the bursts to a local or cosmological origin. The recent detection of a counterpart to a γ-ray burst at other wavelengths, has therefore raised the hope that the sources of these energetic… 

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