Specificity in the symbiotic association between fungus-growing ants and protective Pseudonocardia bacteria

@article{Cafaro2010SpecificityIT,
  title={Specificity in the symbiotic association between fungus-growing ants and protective Pseudonocardia bacteria},
  author={M. Cafaro and M. Poulsen and Ainslie E. F. Little and S. L. Price and N. Gerardo and B. Wong and A. Stuart and B. Larget and P. Abbot and C. Currie},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2010},
  volume={278},
  pages={1814 - 1822}
}
Fungus-growing ants (tribe Attini) engage in a mutualism with a fungus that serves as the ants' primary food source, but successful fungus cultivation is threatened by microfungal parasites (genus Escovopsis). Actinobacteria (genus Pseudonocardia) associate with most of the phylogenetic diversity of fungus-growing ants; are typically maintained on the cuticle of workers; and infection experiments, bioassay challenges and chemical analyses support a role of Pseudonocardia in defence against… Expand
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