Specific language impairment as a period of extended optional infinitive.

@article{Rice1995SpecificLI,
  title={Specific language impairment as a period of extended optional infinitive.},
  author={Mabel L. Rice and Kenneth Wexler and Patricia L. Cleave},
  journal={Journal of speech and hearing research},
  year={1995},
  volume={38 4},
  pages={
          850-63
        }
}
English-speaking children with specific language impairment (SLI) are known to have particular difficulty with the acquisition of grammatical morphemes that carry tense and agreement features, such as the past tense -ed and third-person singular present -s. In this study, an Extended Optional Infinitive (EOI) account of SLI is evaluated. In this account, -ed, -s, BE, and DO are regarded as finiteness markers. This model predicts that finiteness markers are omitted for an extended period of time… 
Toward tense as a clinical marker of specific language impairment in English-speaking children.
  • M. Rice, K. Wexler
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Journal of speech and hearing research
  • 1996
TLDR
A set of morphemes that mark Tense, which includes -s third person singular, -ed regular past, BE, and DO, is evaluated, showing that children in an EOI stage who are likely to mark T tense optionally at the same time know a great deal about the grammatical properties of finiteness and agreement in the adult grammar.
An Extended Optional Infinitive Stage in German-Speaking Children With Specific Language Impairment
An extended period of Optional Infinitives (OIs) has been identified in young English-speaking children with specific language impairment (SLI; Rice and Wexler (1996b), Rice, Wexler, and Cleave
Specific language impairment in Swedish: the status of verb morphology and word order.
TLDR
The grammatical abilities of Swedish-speaking children with SLI were examined for the purpose of evaluating proposals and offering new findings that might be used in the development of alternative accounts.
Production of tense morphology by Afrikaans-speaking children with and without specific language impairment.
TLDR
Tense marking has the potential to be a clinical marker of SLI inAfrikaans, but further research with larger groups of Afrikaans-speaking children, including children of other ages, is needed to confirm this.
Finiteness and children with specific language impairment: an exploratory study
Children with specific language impairment (SLI) are well known for their difficulties in mastering the inflectional paradigms; in the case of learning German they also have problems with the
The Acquisition of Tense in English: Distinguishing child second language from first language and specific language impairment.
TLDR
Results showed that the L2 children had a unique profile compared with their monolingual peers, which was better characterized by the Missing Surface Inflection Hypothesis, which reinforces the assumption underlying the (Extended) Optional Infinitive profile that internal constraints on the acquisition of tense could be a component of L1 development, with and without SLI.
The Morphosyntax of Specific Language Impairment in French: An Extended Optional Default Account
This study examines the use of tense, agreement, and non-tense morphemes and associated distributional contingencies in the language production of Quebec French-speaking children with specific
Case marking in German-speaking children with specific language impairment and with phonological impairment
TLDR
It is suggested that poor case marking in German-speaking children with SLI may alert clinicians to the need for further linguistic assessment, and comparisons with matched typically developing groups and a group with isolated phonological impairment (PI).
Grammatical morphology deficits in Spanish-speaking children with specific language impairment.
  • L. Bedore, L. Leonard
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
  • 2001
TLDR
The pattern of limitations of the children with SU suggests that, for languages such as Spanish, additional factors might have to be considered in the search for clinical markers for this disorder.
Tense over time: the longitudinal course of tense acquisition in children with specific language impairment.
TLDR
The findings show that a diverse set of morphemes share the property of tense marking, and that this set is not mastered until age 4 years in typically developing children and after 7 years for children with SLI; that acquisition shows linear and nonlinear components for both groups, in a typical S-shaped curve.
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