Species invasions and extinction: The future of native biodiversity on islands

@article{Sax2008SpeciesIA,
  title={Species invasions and extinction: The future of native biodiversity on islands},
  author={Dov F. Sax and Steven D. Gaines},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  year={2008},
  volume={105},
  pages={11490 - 11497}
}
  • D. Sax, S. Gaines
  • Published 2008
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Predation by exotic species has caused the extinction of many native animal species on islands, whereas competition from exotic plants has caused few native plant extinctions. Exotic plant addition to islands is highly nonrandom, with an almost perfect 1 to 1 match between the number of naturalized and native plant species on oceanic islands. Here, we evaluate several alternative implications of these findings. Does the consistency of increase in plant richness across islands imply that a… Expand

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