Species Selection Favors Dispersive Life Histories in Sea Slugs, but Higher Per-Offspring Investment Drives Shifts to Short-Lived Larvae.

@article{Krug2015SpeciesSF,
  title={Species Selection Favors Dispersive Life Histories in Sea Slugs, but Higher Per-Offspring Investment Drives Shifts to Short-Lived Larvae.},
  author={Patrick J. Krug and J Vendetti and Ryan A. Ellingson and Cynthia D. Trowbridge and Yayoi M. Hirano and Danielle Y Trathen and Albert K Rodriguez and Cornelis Swennen and Nerida G Wilson and {\'A}ngel Vald{\'e}s},
  journal={Systematic biology},
  year={2015},
  volume={64 6},
  pages={983-99}
}
For 40 years, paleontological studies of marine gastropods have suggested that species selection favors lineages with short-lived (lecithotrophic) larvae, which are less dispersive than long-lived (planktotrophic) larvae. Although lecithotrophs appeared to speciate more often and accumulate over time in some groups, lecithotrophy also increased extinction rates, and tests for state-dependent diversification were never performed. Molecular phylogenies of diverse groups instead suggested… CONTINUE READING
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