Speciation by hybridization in Heliconius butterflies

@article{Mavrez2006SpeciationBH,
  title={Speciation by hybridization in Heliconius butterflies},
  author={J. Mav{\'a}rez and C. Salazar and E. Bermingham and C. Salcedo and C. Jiggins and M. Linares},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2006},
  volume={441},
  pages={868-871}
}
Speciation is generally regarded to result from the splitting of a single lineage. An alternative is hybrid speciation, considered to be extremely rare, in which two distinct lineages contribute genes to a daughter species. Here we show that a hybrid trait in an animal species can directly cause reproductive isolation. The butterfly species Heliconius heurippa is known to have an intermediate morphology and a hybrid genome, and we have recreated its intermediate wing colour and pattern through… Expand
Hybrid trait speciation and Heliconius butterflies
TLDR
It is argued that where hybridization leads to novel adaptive traits that also cause reproductive isolation, it is likely to trigger speciation, and proposed a novel term, ‘hybrid trait speciation’, which combines the idea that hybridization can generate adaptive novelty with the ‘magic trait’ model of ecological speciation. Expand
Genetic Evidence for Hybrid Trait Speciation in Heliconius Butterflies
TLDR
This gene constitutes the first molecular evidence for adaptive introgression during hybrid speciation and is the first clear candidate for a Heliconius wing patterning locus. Expand
TEN Rapid speciation , hybridization and adaptive radiation in the Heliconius melpomene group james mallet
In 1998 it seemed clear that a pair of ‘sister species’ of tropical butterflies, Heliconius melpomene and Heliconius cydno persisted in sympatry in spite of occasional although regular hybridization.Expand
Hybrid zones and the speciation continuum in Heliconius butterflies
TLDR
An intermediate case is found in Colombian Heliconius cydno showing evidence for assortative mating and molecular differences, but where hybrids are abundant. Expand
Genetic analysis of a wild-caught hybrid between non-sister Heliconius butterfly species
TLDR
A rare naturally occurring hybrid between non-sister species is reported and the first genetic analysis of such distant hybridization is carried out, suggesting that gene flow across species boundaries can take place long after speciation. Expand
Speciation and Patterns of Diversity: Rapid speciation, hybridization and adaptive radiation in the Heliconius melpomene group
TLDR
How recent genetic studies, together with ecological and behavioural observations, suggest that the shared colour patterns are indeed due to hybridization and transfer of mimicry adaptations between Heliconius species is detailed. Expand
Ecological Speciation in Mimetic Butterflies
TLDR
It is shown that habitat isolation and color pattern preference are by far the most important factors causing speciation in mimetic butterflies. Expand
Quantified reproductive isolation in Heliconius butterflies: Implications for introgression and hybrid speciation
TLDR
According to these estimates, the Heliconius butterflies are not as promiscuous as has been implied, and the implications of this strong isolation for basic aspects of the hybrid speciation with introgression hypothesis are discussed. Expand
No genomic mosaicism in a putative hybrid butterfly species
TLDR
Frequency variation for 657 amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers and DNA sequence variation from 16 genes are used to determine whether the genome of Heliconius pachinus, a suspected hybrid butterfly species, is a mixture of the putative parental species, Heliconio cydno and Heliconia melpomene. Expand
HYBRIDIZATION AND SPECIATION IN SWORDTAIL FISH (POECILIIDAE: XIPHOPHORUS)
TLDR
The signature of hybridization in the genome of a putative hybrid species, Xiphophorus clemenciae, is investigated through whole genome sequencing of this species and its hypothesized progenitors, and it is found that X. cle menciae is unlikely to have been derived from admixture between its proposed parental species. Expand
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