Specialization and group size: brain and behavioural correlates of colony size in ants lacking morphological castes

@article{AmadorVargas2015SpecializationAG,
  title={Specialization and group size: brain and behavioural correlates of colony size in ants lacking morphological castes},
  author={Sabrina Amador‐Vargas and Wulfila Gronenberg and William T. Wcislo and Ulrich G Mueller},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2015},
  volume={282}
}
Group size in both multicellular organisms and animal societies can correlate with the degree of division of labour. For ants, the task specialization hypothesis (TSH) proposes that increased behavioural specialization enabled by larger group size corresponds to anatomical specialization of worker brains. Alternatively, the social brain hypothesis proposes that increased levels of social stimuli in larger colonies lead to enlarged brain regions in all workers, regardless of their task… 
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