Specialism for larval and adult consumer resources among British butterflies: Implications for conservation

@article{Hardy2007SpecialismFL,
  title={Specialism for larval and adult consumer resources among British butterflies: Implications for conservation},
  author={Peter B. Hardy and Tim H. Sparks and Nick J. B. Isaac and Roger L. H. Dennis},
  journal={Biological Conservation},
  year={2007},
  volume={138},
  pages={440-452}
}
Resources for British butterflies (Lepidoptera: Hesperioidea, Papilionoidea). The alien consumer component and its significance for butterfly habitats
TLDR
Although threatened butterfly species do not depend on alien plants, this may well reflect on specialisation in resource use accompa- nying habitat fragmentation and an inability to use novel resources that are becoming increasingly available.
Adult butterfly feeding–nectar flower associations: constraints of taxonomic affiliation, butterfly, and nectar flower morphology
TLDR
It is suggested that small size and short proboscises could give them a competitive advantage for exploiting nectar in such situations and be of significance for conservation.
The importance of resources in determining butterfly population abundance at multiple scales
TLDR
The results suggest that many UK butterfly species are limited at small scales by the availability of hostplants in warm microclimates, but at large scales by dispersal limitation and climatic tolerance.
Seasonal Change in Nectar Preference for a Mediterranean Butterfly Community
TLDR
An increasing specialization in nectar use was observed in autumn and the trend towards more specialization from summer to autumn was related to a change in relative abundance of flowering plants relative to the richness of butterfly species and abundance present.
An ecological classification of Central European macromoths: habitat associations and conservation status returned from life history attributes
TLDR
A resource-based classification of habitats of Central European macromoths, working with macrolepidopteran moth families, except for the megadiverse Geometridae and Noctuidae, found species resources can be used to reconstruct their habitat needs, and it is possible to scale up from life histories through habitat use to range structures.
Habitat Use of Hipparchia semele (Lepidoptera) in Its Artificial Stronghold: Necessity of the Resource-Based Habitat View in Restoration of Disturbed Sites
TLDR
Habitat-use of the grayling Hipparchia semele, a European endemic xerothermophilous specialist and one of the most rapidly declining butterflies in Central Europe, inhabiting a fly ash deposit in the Kadaň region, western Czech Republic is described.
Nestedness of habitat specialists within habitat generalists in a butterfly assemblage
TLDR
In a butterfly assemblage in northern Italy, it was found that adults from 30 species avoid deciduous high‐density forests and their ecotones, and they were positively related to open areas and their Ecotones.
Oviposition behaviour and emergence through time of the small blue butterfly (Cupido minimus) in a nature reserve in Bedfordshire, UK
TLDR
The results indicate that management for greater availability of taller kidney vetch amongst taller vegetation would encourage small blue oviposition on a greater number of flowerheads, providing a possible means of reducing competition and increasing larval survival, and that this would be effective despite variation in adult abundance between years.
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Based on the results from the three small experiments, restoration of wetlands for L. xanthoides should concentrate plantings of host plant in non-flooded areas and propagate conspicuous patches of the preferred nectar plant.
Does diet breadth control herbivorous insect distribution size? Life history and resource outlets for specialist butterflies
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The model identifies the key variables that connect number of hostplants used by butterflies and the size of butterfly distributions and suggests a more complex functional relationship with implications for conserving insect herbivores.
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The foraging strategies of males and females were similar, mainly serving to minimize time spent searching for nectar source plants to maximize time expenditure on search for mates and host plants, respectively, but females visited a larger number of different plant species for feeding than did males, presumably as a result of their more generalized habitat preferences.
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Factors Influencing Nectar Plant Resource Visits by Butterflies on a University Campus: Implications for Conservation
TLDR
The observations support the value of the university campus in providing valuable resources for butterfl ies and identify nectar host plants belonging to 12 plant families.
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