Special sciences (or: The disunity of science as a working hypothesis)

@article{Fodor2004SpecialS,
  title={Special sciences (or: The disunity of science as a working hypothesis)},
  author={Jerry A. Fodor},
  journal={Synthese},
  year={2004},
  volume={28},
  pages={97-115}
}
  • J. Fodor
  • Published 1 October 1974
  • Philosophy
  • Synthese
A typical thesis of positivistic philosophy of science is that all true theories in the special sciences should reduce to physical theories in the long run. This is intended to be an empirical thesis, and part of the evidence which supports it is provided by such scientific successes as the molecular theory of heat and the physical explanation of the chemical bond. But the philosophical popularity of the reductivist program cannot be explained by reference to these achievements alone. The… 
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