Spatial orientation in weightlessness and readaptation to earth's gravity.

@article{Young1984SpatialOI,
  title={Spatial orientation in weightlessness and readaptation to earth's gravity.},
  author={Laurence R. Young and Charles M. Oman and Douglas G. Watt and Kenneth E. Money and Betty K. Lichtenberg},
  journal={Science},
  year={1984},
  volume={225 4658},
  pages={
          205-8
        }
}
Unusual vestibular responses to head movements in weightlessness may produce spatial orientation illusions and symptoms of space motion sickness. An integrated set of experiments was performed during Spacelab 1, as well as before and after the flight, to evaluate responses mediated by the otolith organs and semicircular canals. A variety of measurements were used, including eye movements, postural control, perception of orientation, and susceptibility to space sickness. 

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