Spatial movement of adult leopard seals (Hydrurga leptonyx) in Prydz Bay, Eastern Antarctica

@article{Rogers2004SpatialMO,
  title={Spatial movement of adult leopard seals (Hydrurga leptonyx) in Prydz Bay, Eastern Antarctica},
  author={Tracey L. Rogers and Carolyn J. Hogg and Andrew D. Irvine},
  journal={Polar Biology},
  year={2004},
  volume={28},
  pages={456-463}
}
This is the first study that has used satellite telemetry to assess the spatial behaviour of adult leopard seals. Satellite tags on 11 leopard seals transmitted between 29 days and 282 days. Swim speeds, distances swum per day and distances from tagging site were significantly different among individuals and seasons. Swim speeds ranged from 0.004 km/h to 10.86 km/h; distances swum per day from 0 km/day to 150 km/day; and the maximum distances from tagging site ranged from 33.30 km to 319.97 km… Expand

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