Spatial and foveal biases, not perceived mass or heaviness, explain the effect of target size on representational momentum and representational gravity.

@article{Teixeira2014SpatialAF,
  title={Spatial and foveal biases, not perceived mass or heaviness, explain the effect of target size on representational momentum and representational gravity.},
  author={Nuno Alexandre De S{\'a} Teixeira and Armando M{\'o}nica Oliveira},
  journal={Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition},
  year={2014},
  volume={40 6},
  pages={1664-79}
}
The spatial memory for the last position occupied by a moving target is usually displaced forward in the direction of motion. Interpreted as a mental analogue of physical momentum, this phenomenon was coined representational momentum (RM). As momentum is given by the product of an object's velocity and mass, both these factors came to be under scrutiny in RM studies, the goal being to provide support for the internalization hypothesis. Although velocity was found to determine RM's magnitude… CONTINUE READING