Spanish Loanwords in Hopi; A Preliminary Checklist

@article{Dockstader1955SpanishLI,
  title={Spanish Loanwords in Hopi; A Preliminary Checklist},
  author={Frederick J. Dockstader},
  journal={International Journal of American Linguistics},
  year={1955},
  volume={21},
  pages={157 - 159}
}
9 Citations
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