Space and Place in Chinese Religious Traditions

@article{Faure1987SpaceAP,
  title={Space and Place in Chinese Religious Traditions},
  author={Bernard R. Faure},
  journal={History of Religions},
  year={1987},
  volume={26},
  pages={337 - 356}
}
  • B. Faure
  • Published 1 May 1987
  • History
  • History of Religions

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