Soy Food Consumption and Risk of Prostate Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

@article{Hwang2009SoyFC,
  title={Soy Food Consumption and Risk of Prostate Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies},
  author={Ye Won Hwang and Soo Young Kim and Sun Ha Jee and Youn Nam Kim and Chung Mo Nam},
  journal={Nutrition and Cancer},
  year={2009},
  volume={61},
  pages={598 - 606}
}
Soybean products have been suggested to have a chemo preventive effect against prostate cancer. [] Key Method Five cohort studies and 8 case-control studies were identified using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Korea Medical Database, KoreaMed, Korean studies Information Service System, Japana Centra Revuo Medicina, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and a manual search.

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Systematic Review and Meta-analysis on the Effect of Soy on Thyroid Function

Soy supplementation has no effect on the thyroid hormones and only very modestly raises TSH levels, the clinical significance, if any, of the rise in TSH is unclear.

The Associations of Soy Intakes with Non-communicable Diseases: A Scoping Review of Meta-Analyses.

Being the products with lower greenhouse gas emission intensities, soy products could be the better dietary alternatives to animal products for reducing cardiovascular, cancer, and diabetes II diseases and helping combat climate change.
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