Sovereign Justice in Precolonial Maritime Asia: The Case of the Mayor's Court of Bombay, 1726–1798

@article{Sood2013SovereignJI,
  title={Sovereign Justice in Precolonial Maritime Asia: The Case of the Mayor's Court of Bombay, 1726–1798},
  author={Gagan D. S. Sood},
  journal={Itinerario},
  year={2013},
  volume={37},
  pages={46 - 72}
}
  • G. Sood
  • Published 1 August 2013
  • History
  • Itinerario
From the beginning of the nineteenth century, remarkable developments in the realm of law were witnessed throughout the world. They expressed and paved the way for a new type of dispensation. For those parts of Asia and the Middle East with a substantial European presence, the legitimate rules, principles, and procedures for resolving disputes were progressively assimilated into systems of state-sanctioned legal pluralism. The process—at once gradual, charged, and punctuated—coincided with the… 
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