Southern African ancient genomes estimate modern human divergence to 350,000 to 260,000 years ago

@article{Schlebusch2017SouthernAA,
  title={Southern African ancient genomes estimate modern human divergence to 350,000 to 260,000 years ago},
  author={C. Schlebusch and H. Malmstr{\"o}m and T. G{\"u}nther and P. Sjoedin and Alexandra Coutinho and Hanna Edlund and A. Munters and M. Vicente and M. Steyn and H. Soodyall and M. Lombard and M. Jakobsson},
  journal={Science},
  year={2017},
  volume={358},
  pages={652 - 655}
}
  • C. Schlebusch, H. Malmström, +9 authors M. Jakobsson
  • Published 2017
  • Geography, Medicine
  • Science
  • Ancient DNA pushes human emergence back Anatomically modern humans evolved in Africa, but pinpointing when has been difficult. Schlebusch et al. sequenced three ancient African genomes from the Stone Age, about 2000 years old, and four from the Iron Age, 300 to 500 years old. One of the oldest samples, sequenced to 13× coverage, appears most closely to resemble individuals from the present-day San population. However, this individual seems to have lacked genetic contributions from other modern… CONTINUE READING

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