Sound transmission in archaic and modern whales: Anatomical adaptations for underwater hearing

@article{Nummela2007SoundTI,
  title={Sound transmission in archaic and modern whales: Anatomical adaptations for underwater hearing},
  author={Sirpa Nummela and J. G. M. Thewissen and Sunil Bajpai and Taseer Hussain and Kishor Kumar},
  journal={The Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2007},
  volume={290}
}
The whale ear, initially designed for hearing in air, became adapted for hearing underwater in less than ten million years of evolution. This study describes the evolution of underwater hearing in cetaceans, focusing on changes in sound transmission mechanisms. Measurements were made on 60 fossils of whole or partial skulls, isolated tympanics, middle ear ossicles, and mandibles from all six archaeocete families. Fossil data were compared with data on two families of modern mysticete whales and… 
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