Sound strategies: the 65-million-year-old battle between bats and insects.

@article{Conner2012SoundST,
  title={Sound strategies: the 65-million-year-old battle between bats and insects.},
  author={William E. Conner and Aaron J. Corcoran},
  journal={Annual review of entomology},
  year={2012},
  volume={57},
  pages={
          21-39
        }
}
The intimate details regarding the coevolution of bats and moths have been elucidated over the past 50 years. The bat-moth story began with the evolution of bat sonar, an exquisite ultrasonic system for tracking prey through the night sky. Moths countered with ears tuned to the high frequencies of bat echolocation and with evasive action through directed turns, loops, spirals, drops, and power dives. Some bat species responded by moving the frequency and intensity of their echolocation cries… Expand
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