Sound signalling in orthoptera

@article{Robinson2002SoundSI,
  title={Sound signalling in orthoptera},
  author={David Robinson and Marion Hall},
  journal={Advances in Insect Physiology},
  year={2002},
  volume={29},
  pages={151-278}
}
The sounds produced by orthopteran insects are very diverse. They are widely studied for the insight they give into acoustic behaviour and the biophysical aspects of sound production and hearing, as well as the transduction of sound to neural signals in the ear and the subsequent processing of information in the central nervous system. The study of sound signalling is a multidisciplinary area of research, with a strong physiological contribution. This review considers recent research in… Expand
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