Sound production in the cockroach,Gromphadorhina portentosa: The sound-producing apparatus

@article{Nelson2004SoundPI,
  title={Sound production in the cockroach,Gromphadorhina portentosa: The sound-producing apparatus},
  author={Margaret C. Nelson},
  journal={Journal of comparative physiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={132},
  pages={27-38}
}
  • M. Nelson
  • Published 1 March 1979
  • Biology
  • Journal of comparative physiology
Summary1.The giant Madagascar cockroach,Gromphadorhina portentosa, hisses by expelling air from a pair of specialized abdominal spiracles. [] Key Method These features, which are lacking in other spiracles, are sufficient to account for the character of the sound (Fig. 10).3.The motoneurons innervating both types of spiracles were located by axonal diffusion of cobalt, and their morphology was determined in wholemounted ganglia. The number, ganglionic locations, and in some cases branching patterns of…
Sound production in the cockroach, Gromphadorhina portentosa: evidence for communication by hissing
TLDR
Evidence supports the hypothesis that the giant Madagascar cockroach G. portentosa has evolved a system of communication in which hisses serve as auditory social signals.
Whistling in caterpillars (Amorpha juglandis, Bombycoidea): sound-producing mechanism and function
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It is concluded that caterpillar whistles are defensive and proposed that they function specifically as acoustic ‘eye spots’ to startle predators.
Coordinated ventilation and spiracle activity produce unidirectional airflow in the hissing cockroach, Gromphadorhina portentosa
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The respiratory system of the hissing cockroach functions as a unidirectional pump through the coordinated action of the spiracles and abdominal musculature, which may be employed by a broad diversity of large insects that respire by active ventilation.
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A caterpillar that ‘vocalizes’ by forcing air into and out of its gut is reported, analogous to vocalization in vertebrates, to ‘shout’ at predators.
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This study explores the defensive acoustic signals of this species and indicates that A. insignis is capable of producing three classes of acoustic signals (whistles, whistle–hisses and hisses) associated with defensive behaviour.
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The major conclusion is that whereas nongiant tailflipping behavior (overt behavior and motor pattern) and underlying musculature were conserved in evolution ofM.
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Sound generation in Mantis religiosa (Mantodea: Mantidae): stridulatory structures and acoustic signal
TLDR
Acoustic parameters which appear to vary between the sexes and/or among females at different reproductive stages, may be related to the sexual size dimorphism of this species and morphological constraints associated with egg-bearing.
Insect disturbance stridulation: Characterization of airborne and vibrational components of the sound
  • W. Masters
  • Physics
    Journal of comparative physiology
  • 2004
TLDR
Analysis of the temporal and spectral characteristics of the disturbance sounds of a variety of insects that stridulate by a file- and -scraper device found common characteristics may lead predators to treat insects producing disturbance sounds similarly, although this possibility should be tested empirically.
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Sound production in the cockroach, Gromphadorhina portentosa: evidence for communication by hissing
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Evidence supports the hypothesis that the giant Madagascar cockroach G. portentosa has evolved a system of communication in which hisses serve as auditory social signals.
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