Songs about fucking: John Loder's southern studios and the construction of a subversive sonic signature

@article{Bennett2017SongsAF,
  title={Songs about fucking: John Loder's southern studios and the construction of a subversive sonic signature},
  author={Samantha Bennett},
  journal={Journal of Popular Music Studies},
  year={2017},
  volume={29}
}
This article posits North London's Southern Studios and its late founding recordist John Loder as responsible for the construction of a sonically discernible production aesthetics befitting a subversive music. Blending phonomusicological work on the recording workplace and recordists, original ethnographic work, as well as tech-processual analyses of two key recordings, Crass’ “Do They Owe Us A Living?” and Big Black's “The Power of Independent Trucking,” this article elucidates the Southern… 

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