Song ranging by the dusky antbird, Cercomacra tyrannina: ranging without song learning

@article{Morton1996SongRB,
  title={Song ranging by the dusky antbird, Cercomacra tyrannina: ranging without song learning},
  author={Eugene S. Morton and Kim C. Derrickson},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={1996},
  volume={39},
  pages={195-201}
}
Abstract In a population of dusky antbirds (Cercomacra tyrannina), less aggressive responses to distance-degraded playbacks than to undegraded playbacks of pair duets show that this tropical suboscine passerine uses sound degradation to range distance from singing conspecifics. This is the first example of song-ranging in a species that does not learn songs, supporting the hypothesis that ranging preceded the song learning that occurs in more recently evolved passerine birds (oscines). Both… 
Use of song amplitude for ranging in Carolina wrens, Thryothorus ludovicianus
Songbirds are well known to use the degradation of conspecific song to assess the distance of the singer (called ranging). Because a song's degradation accumulates progressively with propagation
VOCAL DISTINCTIVENESS AND RESPONSE TO CONSPECIFIC PLAYBACK IN THE SPOTTED ANTBIRD, A NEOTROPICAL SUBOSCINE
TLDR
The results suggest that selection has not favored the evolution of neighbor-stranger discrimination, perhaps because all conspecific intruders pose a threat.
DEMOGRAPHY AND REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS IN THE DUSKY ANTBIRD, A SEDENTARY TROPICAL PASSERINE
TLDR
It is suggested that for Dusky Antbirds, a species with no extra-pair mating behavior, a long adult lifespan appears to be the primary means to increase lifetime reproductive success.
Duets defend mates in a suboscine passerine, the warbling antbird (Hypocnemis cantator)
TLDR
It is suggested that females adjust their vocal behavior in relation to the level of perceived threat to the partnership, and duet with males in order to repel same-sex rivals.
Individual differences in the vocalizations of the buff-throated woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus guttatus), a suboscine bird of neotropical forests
TLDR
Questions remain regarding whether the buffthroated woodcreeper can use these differences for individual recognition and how the two song types function in communication.
Shared territorial defence in the suboscine Aphrastura spinicauda
TLDR
This is the first report of coordinated or joint territorial defence in a South American suboscine that generally only maintains short-term pair bonds and, compared to females, males displayed more alarm calling during their response, approached closer and were also more physically aggressive towards conspecific intruders.
Alternate functions for duet and solo songs in magpie-larks, Grallina cyanoleuca
TLDR
Playground experiments suggested that duetting in magpie-larks was consistent with both defence of the territory and guarding the mate against usurpation, and duets are most likely to be performed for the purpose of cooperative territorial defence.
Territory switching behavior in a sedentary tropical passerine, the dusky antbird (Cercomacra tyrannina)
TLDR
It is suggested that switching is favored when low annual reproductive success enhances selection for a long lifespan as the primary means to increase reproductive success.
Neighbor-stranger discrimination by song in a suboscine bird, the alder flycatcher, Empidonax alnorum
TLDR
A suboscine bird, the alder flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum), was able to discriminate between songs of neighbors and strangers despite limited individual variation in song, demonstrating that, similar to their oscine relatives, they can discriminate between the songs of neighbor and strangers.
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