Song power, spectral distribution and female phonotaxis in the bushcricket Requena verticalis (Tettigoniidae: Orthoptera): active female choice or passive attraction

@article{Bailey1990SongPS,
  title={Song power, spectral distribution and female phonotaxis in the bushcricket Requena verticalis (Tettigoniidae: Orthoptera): active female choice or passive attraction},
  author={Winston J. Bailey and Robert J. Cunningham and L. Antoine Lebel},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1990},
  volume={40},
  pages={33-42}
}
Decisions during Phonotaxis in the Bushcricket Requena verticalis (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae): Do Females Change Direction to Alternative Male Calls?
TLDR
Female bushcrickets show a preference between male calls that differ in three parameters, temporal structure, frequency and intensity, and when offered an alternative call while orienting to a model of their conspecific song the alternative call was demonstrably preferred by females when presented in a paired-speaker trial.
Song discrimination by male cicadas Cicada barbara lusitanica (Homoptera, Cicadidae).
TLDR
Cicada barbara lusitanica males presented a stereotyped singing response behaviour when exposed to a playback of the conspecific song, and discriminated frequencies within 3-15 kHz, clearly preferring 6 and 9 kHz; both these frequencies matched the main spectral peaks of the song.
DUET SINGING AND FEMALE CHOICE IN THE BUSHCRICKET PHANEROPTERA NANA
TLDR
The selective responses exhibited by Ph. nana females contradict some previous expectations that females in duet signalling systems should be indiscriminate.
Choice of singing sites by male bushcrickets (Tettigonia viridissima) in relation to signal propagation
TLDR
The spatial dispersion of singing male bushcrickets (Tettigonia viridissima) in a marshland habitat was found to be significantly clumped and the spacing strategy adopted by males reflects a compromise between maximizing the range over which their songs can be detected and accurately localized by females and minimizing interference from competing males.
Sensory basis for sound intensity discrimination in the bushcricket Requena verticalis (Tettigoniidae, Orthoptera)
Abstract The ability of the female bushcricket, Requena verticalis, to discriminate between two conspecific sound signals that differed in sound pressure level (SPL) was tested in a two-choice
Sound‐pressure Levels and Song Preferences in Female Red‐winged Blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) (Aves, Emberizidae)
TLDR
Female red-winged blackbirds responded preferentially to a conspecific song relative to a heterospecific imitation, even when the imitation was presented at an SPL 13 dB higher than that of the conspecial song.
Do large bushcrickets have more sensitive ears? Natural variation in hearing thresholds within populations of the bushcricket Requena verticalis (Listroscelidinae: Tettigoniidae)
TLDR
Hearing thresholds of both sexes of the bushcricket, Requena verticalis Walker, were measured at the male call’s carrier frequency and were found to correlate with spiracle dimension, which correlates with the size of the insect as measured by pronotum length.
Selective phonotaxis of female crickets under natural outdoor conditions
TLDR
Phonotaxis experiments with female field crickets are performed outdoors, using two-choice decisions based on differences in carrier frequency, sound pressure level, and chirp rate to make predictions about patterns of sexual selection.
Acoustic satellite behaviour in the Australian bushcricket Elephantodeta nobilis (Phaneropterinae, Tettigoniidae, Orthoptera)
TLDR
Although females preferred the alpha male they were nevertheless attracted to the satellite calls regardless of the latter's relative intensity, and the possible role of satellite calling as a novel conditional strategy is discussed.
Multivariate sexual selection on male song structure in wild populations of sagebrush crickets, Cyphoderris strepitans (Orthoptera: Haglidae)
TLDR
A complex pattern of multivariate nonlinear selection characterized primarily by strong stabilizing and disruptive selection on male song traits is revealed, suggesting that the female auditory system is tightly tuned to the species-specific call frequency.
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References

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Female phonotaxis and frequency discrimination in the bushcricket Requena verticalis
TLDR
It is concluded that females are choosing males on the amount of power in the higher frequency range of their song and that this may be equivalent to a close calling male in the field.
Phonotactic preferences of female meadow katydids (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Conocephalus nigropleurum)
TLDR
Sexually receptive females of Conocephalus nigropleurum were tested in an arena at 30 °C for responsiveness to tape-recorded models of male calling song, indicating that discriminatory criteria change with particular combinations.
Mating System, Mate Choice and Ultrasonic Calling in a Zaprochiline Katydid (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae)
TLDR
Sexual communication and the mating system of an undescribed genus of zaprochiline katydid is described and it is suggested that females do not prefer calls of large males because only in the early part of the season does male song give information on the size of the male and his spermatophore glands.
Male Agonistic Behaviour of the Bushcricket Mygalopsis marki Bailey in Response to Conspecific Song (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae)
TLDR
By increasing the density of natural aggregations of singing males, the behavioural responses of individuals were observed and in high density situations, males sang from lower perches in their plant and this effect was correlated with each male's proximity to other calling males.
Spatial Dynamics and Breeding Ecology in the Cicada Cystosoma saundersii: The Interaction Between Distributions of Resources and Intraspecific Behaviour
TLDR
The most successful males at obtaining matings were those which appeared to enhance the propagation of their songs by adopting several behavioural strategies, which include the selection of smaller bushes; singing at a height which is maximally efficient for transmitting their song frequency; and by singing in close proximity to other males.
The function of sound in male spacing behaviour in bush-crickets (Tettigoniidae, Orthoptera).
TLDR
It is established that singing males of the genus Mygalopsis are regularly spaced within aggregations and that sound is involved in spacing.
SEXUAL SELECTION AND THE EVOLUTION OF SONG
TLDR
The question of why listeners have evolved to respond to song in the contexts of female choice and male contest is examined, and ideas and evidence on the evolution of relationships betweensong and female choice, and between song and success in male contests are reviewed.
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