Song learning in birds: the relation between perception and production.

@article{Nottebohm1990SongLI,
  title={Song learning in birds: the relation between perception and production.},
  author={Fernando Nottebohm and Arturo {\'A}lvarez-Buylla and Jeffrey Cynx and John R Kirn and Changying Ling and Marta E. Nottebohm and Richard W. Suter and Arnold Tolles and Heather Williams},
  journal={Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences},
  year={1990},
  volume={329 1253},
  pages={
          115-24
        }
}
The vocal control system of oscine songbirds has some perplexing properties--e.g. laterality, adult neurogenesis, neuronal replacement--that are not predicted by common views of how vocal learning takes place. Similarly, we do not understand the relation between the direct pathway for the control of learned song and the recursive pathway necessary for song learning. Some of the paradoxes of the vocal system of birds may disappear once the relation between the perception and production of… 
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TLDR
The results show that an input other than that from LMAN must be primarily responsible for auditory responses in RA, and that the direct projection from HVC is the most likely pathway by which song selective auditory information arrives in RA.
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