Song as an aggressive signal in songbirds

@article{Searcy2009SongAA,
  title={Song as an aggressive signal in songbirds},
  author={W. Searcy and M. D. Beecher},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2009},
  volume={78},
  pages={1281-1292}
}
Birdsong is often regarded as an aggressive signal. More specifically, particular singing behaviours are hypothesized to be threatening, including song type matching, frequency matching, song overlapping, song type switching and low-amplitude song. The term aggressive signal should be reserved for behaviours that are associated with, and, in that sense, signal aggressive escalation. Three criteria are relevant to whether a signal should be classified as aggressive: (1) whether the signal… Expand

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