Song activity in the chiffchaff: territorial defence or mate guarding?

@article{Rodrigues1996SongAI,
  title={Song activity in the chiffchaff: territorial defence or mate guarding?},
  author={Marcos Rodrigues},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1996},
  volume={51},
  pages={709-716}
}
Abstract It has been suggested that males of passerine bird species sing most actively during the fertile period of their mates partly as a paternity guard strategy and partly to maximize their own extra-pair copulation success. This investigation considers whether song is used as a paternity guard strategy in the chiffchaff,Phylloscopus collybita. The study was carried out in south-eastern England (Wytham Woods, Oxford) during 1993 and 1994. Song rate was calculated as the proportion of a 5… Expand
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