Something smells fishy: predator-naïve salmon use diet cues, not kairomones, to recognize a sympatric mammalian predator

@article{Roberts2011SomethingSF,
  title={Something smells fishy: predator-na{\"i}ve salmon use diet cues, not kairomones, to recognize a sympatric mammalian predator},
  author={L. J. Roberts and Carlos Garcia de Leaniz},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2011},
  volume={82},
  pages={619-625}
}

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