Some Remarks on Uto-Aztecan Classification

@article{CortinaBorja1989SomeRO,
  title={Some Remarks on Uto-Aztecan Classification},
  author={M. Cortina-Borja},
  journal={International Journal of American Linguistics},
  year={1989},
  volume={55},
  pages={214 - 239}
}
  • M. Cortina-Borja
  • Published 1989
  • Sociology
  • International Journal of American Linguistics
Introduction. This paper employs a quantitative approach to address a series of qualitative problems posed in the classification of the UtoAztecan languages proposed by Miller (1984) based on lexical evidence, on the assumption that the addition of certain quantitative techniques to traditional linguistic analysis could help to refine or resolve certain existing questions and perhaps suggest additional ones. Our intention was not only to enhance Miller's classification with other data analysis… Expand
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