Some Notes on the Office of Master of the Rolls

@article{Hanworth1935SomeNO,
  title={Some Notes on the Office of Master of the Rolls},
  author={Lord Hanworth},
  journal={The Cambridge Law Journal},
  year={1935},
  volume={5},
  pages={313 - 331}
}
  • Lord Hanworth
  • Published 1 November 1935
  • History
  • The Cambridge Law Journal
The origins of the Office of Master of the Rolls are to be sought in the history of the development of the Chancery. The Chancery was at first a branch of the royal household closely connected with the king's chapel. The Chancellor was simply the king's chaplain who in the intervals of his proper duties acted as the king's secretary. As such he became the custodian of the king's seal,—later to be called the great seal to distinguish it from other and smaller seals,—and at length his secretarial… 
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