Some Lexical Clues to Uto-Aztecan Prehistory

@article{Fowler1983SomeLC,
  title={Some Lexical Clues to Uto-Aztecan Prehistory},
  author={C. Fowler},
  journal={International Journal of American Linguistics},
  year={1983},
  volume={49},
  pages={224 - 257}
}
  • C. Fowler
  • Published 1983
  • Sociology
  • International Journal of American Linguistics
0. Introduction. Over the years many have used linguistic evidence of various kinds and in various ways in the quest for parsimonious solutions to the many problems of Uto-Aztecan prehistory. Archaeologists, armed principally with evidence of present-day language distributions and speculations about genetic connections for language phylla and macrophylla, have argued for both early and late migrations of UtoAztecan speakers into and out of several specific areas in the Desert West (e.g., Taylor… Expand
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