Some Archaeological and Topographical Results of a Trip through Palestine

@article{AlbrightSomeAA,
  title={Some Archaeological and Topographical Results of a Trip through Palestine},
  author={William Foxwell Albright},
  journal={Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research},
  volume={11},
  pages={3 - 1}
}
  • W. F. Albright
  • Published 1 October 1923
  • History
  • Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research
It is often thought that there are no longer any discoveries to be made above ground in Palestine. So many distinguished scholars have combed the country in all directions during the past century that they have surely exhausted the possibilities! It is true that Palestine is a little land; it is also true that the number of savants and expeditions that have worked in it is relatively great. Strange to say, however, there is still work of importance to be done in this field, and there are still… 
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