Somatic mutation in cancer and normal cells

@article{Martincorena2015SomaticMI,
  title={Somatic mutation in cancer and normal cells},
  author={I{\~n}igo Martincorena and Peter J. Campbell},
  journal={Science},
  year={2015},
  volume={349},
  pages={1483 - 1489}
}
Spontaneously occurring mutations accumulate in somatic cells throughout a person’s lifetime. The majority of these mutations do not have a noticeable effect, but some can alter key cellular functions. Early somatic mutations can cause developmental disorders, whereas the progressive accumulation of mutations throughout life can lead to cancer and contribute to aging. Genome sequencing has revolutionized our understanding of somatic mutation in cancer, providing a detailed view of the… 
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