Solitary behavior in a high-altitude population of the social sweat bee Halictus rubicundus (Hymenoptera: Halictidae)

@article{Eickwort1996SolitaryBI,
  title={Solitary behavior in a high-altitude population of the social sweat bee Halictus rubicundus (Hymenoptera: Halictidae)},
  author={G. C. Eickwort and J. Eickwort and J. Gordon and M. A. Eickwort and W. Wcislo},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={1996},
  volume={38},
  pages={227-233}
}
Abstract In the subalpine region of the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, United States, Halictus rubicundus has a solitary life cycle, but it is social in other parts of its known range. The brood is protandrous, with a nearly equal investment in the sexes. Productivity averages 6.5 offspring per foundress female, similar to the second brood of social nests in New York, but less than the combined productivity of both New York broods. Leucophora sp. (Diptera: Anthomyiidae) is the principal cause of… Expand

Tables from this paper

Life-cycle of Halictus rubicundus christ (Hymenoptera: Halictidae) in the Netherlands: comparison of two populations
TLDR
Evidence suggests that the shel tered population is bivoltine and possibly social, whereas the exposed population is univol tine, and limited data indicate a female bias in the first brood of the sheltered population, but no, or slight, male bias inThe exposed population. Expand
Biology of a nocturnal bee, Megalopta atra (Hymenoptera: Halictidae; Augochlorini), from the Panamanian highlands
TLDR
Nests of Megalopta atra from the highlands of Chiriqui Province, Panama were collected at the end of the dry season when brood rearing is expected to be at its peak, and there was no evidence of a non‐reproductive worker‐like caste and multifemale nests did not appear to be more productive than solitary nests, which may represent pre-reproductive assemblages. Expand
Nesting Biology and Socially Polymorphic Behavior of the Sweat Bee Halictus rubicundus (Hymenoptera: Halictidae)
TLDR
It is concluded that nest-site philopatry is important in structuring populations so that social behavior is favored over bivoltinism in warm climates. Expand
Colony Social Organisation of Halictus confusus in Southern Ontario, with Comments on Sociality in the Subgenus H. (Seladonia)
TLDR
Comparisons with other members of the subgenus suggest that in Seladonia, as in other eusocial halictines, queen control of worker behaviour depends on the ability of queens to dominate small numbers of small-bodied workers. Expand
Nesting biology and phenology of a population of Halictus farinosus Smith (Hymenoptera, Halictidae) in northern Utah
TLDR
Varying weather patterns in the years of study led to changes in phenological milestones: in the colder and wetter spring of 2010, nesting behavior was delayed by up to two weeks compared to the other years, and nest productivity was comparable among years, indicating an effect of annual variation in weather conditions on social parameters in this species. Expand
Social polymorphism in the sweat bee Lasioglossum (Evylaeus) baleicum (Cockerell) (Hymenoptera, Halictidae) in Hokkaido, northern Japan
TLDR
Investigation in two geographically separate populations in Hokkaido, northern Japan found some solitary colonies in the Nishioka population and evidence of a partial second brood in some colonies at Kawakita, suggesting differences between the populations are not fixed and that this species is truly socially polymorphic. Expand
Frequency of social nesting in the sweat bee Megaloptagenalis (Halictidae) does not vary across a rainfall gradient, despite disparity in brood production and body size
TLDR
Results show that phenotypes of M. genalis relevant to social behaviour (ovarian development, brood production, body size) may be responsive to variation in local environment over distances of <20 km. Expand
Chemical Variation among Castes, Female Life Stages and Populations of the Facultative Eusocial Sweat Bee Halictus rubicundus (Hymenoptera: Halictidae)
TLDR
This study compared the chemical profiles of social and solitary populations from both continents and tested whether (i) population or social level affect chemical dissimilarity and (ii) caste-specific patterns reflect a conserved queen signal, finding common compounds overproduced in queens compared to workers in both populations, indicating a potential conservedQueen signal. Expand
Nesting biology and social organization of Halictus sexcinctus (Fabricius) in southern Greece
TLDR
Weak eusociality in this Mediterranean population is characterized by haplometrotic nest-founding, a relatively high degree of queen size dimorphism, high rates of worker mating and ovarian development, relatively short queen life-spans, and relatively low second-brood productivity. Expand
Demography and relatedness in multiple-foundress nests of the social sweat bee, Halictus ligatus
TLDR
It is suggested that pleometrosis most likely results from accidental encounters between spring foundresses as they leave their hibernacula, and once formed, such associations confer a survival advantage on the nest as a whole, but do not result in greater reproductive brood productivity. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 33 REFERENCES
The phenology and social biology of four sweat bees in a marginal environment: Cape Breton Island
TLDR
Most foundresses observed in 1987 were extremely small, smaller than usual for workers elsewhere, and none of the more than 100 nests produced adult workers or a reproductive brood, and most foundresses were either survivors of the worker brood from the previous year or... Expand
The Evolution of Social Behavior in Insects and Arachnids: Behavioral environments of sweat bees (Halictinae) in relation to variability in social organization
TLDR
An overview of variability in social behavior of sweat bees shows why a consideration of environmental influences helps to understand the current distribution of halictine social behavior and how it evolved. Expand
Social plasticity and early-diapausing females in a primitively social bee.
  • D. Yanega
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1988
Many of the females of the first summer brood of the sweat bee Halictus rubicundus mate, soon vanish from the nesting site, undergo diapause, and return unworn the following spring to found their ownExpand
Colony structure, provisioning and sex allocation in the sweat bee Halictus ligatus (Hymenoptera: Halictidae)
TLDR
The observed increase of female bias in the nest sex ratio with increasing numbers of eusocial worker bees conforms to optimization predictions following from kin-selection theory. Expand
Density-Dependent Parasitism and the Evolution of Aggregated Nesting in the Solitary Hymenoptera
TLDR
Field studies of density-dependent foraging by nest parasites and resulting patterns of nest exploitation to test generalizations concerning the effects of parasites are reviewed and data supporting these hypotheses are critically reviewed. Expand
Reproduction and Castes in Social Halictine Bees
TLDR
The Halictinae are an enormous and abundant group, worldwide in distribution, arctic to tropical, and every continent has forms whose social biologies remain unknown. Expand
Distribution and Bionomics of a Transpalaearctic Eusocial Halictine Bee, Lasioglossum (Evylaeus) calceatum, in Northern Japan, with Reference to Its Solitary Life Cycle at High Altitude (With 9 Text-figures and 2 Tables)
Title Distribution and Bionomics of a Transpalaearctic Eusocial Halictine Bee, Lasioglossum (Evylaeus) calceatum, in Northern Japan, with Reference to Its Solitary Life Cycle at High Altitude (With 9Expand
Late Quaternary Lacustrine Pollen Records from Southwestern Beringia
Sediment cores from three lakes in the Upper Kolyma region, northeast Russia, provide the first well-dated continuous record of late Quaternary vegetation change from far southwestern Beringia. TheExpand
Haplodiploidy and the Evolution of Facultative Sex Ratios in a Primitively Eusocial Bee
TLDR
To test the prediction of sex-ratio biasing, relatedness asymmetries were experimentally manipulated in colonies of the primitively eusocial bee Augochlorella striata by removing or not removing foundress queens to produce a more female-biased sex ratio. Expand
ALLOZYME VARIATION IN HALICTUS RUBICUNDUS (CHRIST): A PRIMITIVELY SOCIAL HALICTINE BEE (HYMENOPTERA: HALICTIDAE)
L'etude de la variation electrophoretique observee a 48 loci et pour 37 enzymes avec en moyenne 38 abeilles par locus a revele un niveau d'heterozygotie de 0,038±0,018 dans une population. CetteExpand
...
1
2
3
4
...