Solega Ethno-Ornithology

@inproceedings{Agnihotri2012SolegaE,
  title={Solega Ethno-Ornithology},
  author={Samira Agnihotri and Aung Si},
  year={2012}
}
Abstract Birds figure prominently in the traditional knowledge systems of many cultures by virtue of the diverse ways in which humans perceive these creatures, as religious totems, crop pests, food items, sentinels, guides and heralds, to name a few. This preliminary documentation of the traditional ornithological knowledge of the Solega people of southern India discusses the difficulties involved in obtaining a standard set of names that has the consensus of people living in widely dispersed… 

Edible Insect Larvae in Kaytetye: Their Nomenclature and Significance

TLDR
The rich cultural and culinary traditions surrounding an important insect group, namely a class of edible insect larvae consumed by a desert community in central Australia, are described, with special attention to cultural and linguistic factors.

Tiger Becomes Termite Hill: Soliga/Solega Perceptions of Wildlife Interactions and Ecological Change

The Solega community living in the Biligiri Rangan Hills (B. R. Hills) of Karnataka State, southern India, have noticed significant changes to the ecosystem of their forest homeland over the last

Ex-situ Documentation of Ethnobiology

Migrant speakers of endangered languages living in urban centers in developed countries represent a valuable resource through which these languages may be conveniently documented. Here, we first

The Potential for Flora–Fauna Wordlists to Contribute to Biodiversity Research: Myanmar Birds as a Case Study

Traditional ecological knowledge recorded as part of a language documentation program can include valuable information on the presence or absence of plant and animal species in a given locality. Such

Do artisanal fishers perceive declining migratory shorebird populations?

TLDR
Changes in the local landscape related to urbanization and tourism are most likely the primary causes underlying the reduced migratory shorebird populations as reported by local inhabitants.

Patterns in the transmission of traditional ecological knowledge: a case study from Arnhem Land, Australia

  • Aung Si
  • Environmental Science
    Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
  • 2020
TLDR
Performance in the plant and bird naming tasks was lower than expected for a community where language transmission to younger generations is high, due to lifestyle change, particularly in terms of food habits, or due to inter-individual differences in life histories.

Flora–Fauna Loanwords in Arnhem Land and Beyond—An Ethnobiological Approach*

  • Aung Si
  • Linguistics
    Australian Journal of Linguistics
  • 2019
Borrowing is said to be a pervasive phenomenon among Australian languages, particularly in the domains of flora–fauna and material culture. In-depth studies of borrowing in individual languages or

Revamping the Metaphysics of Ethnobiological Classification

Ethnobiology has a long tradition of metaphysical debates about the “naturalness,” “objectivity,” “reality,” and “universality” of classifications. The work of Brent Berlin has been especially

Warblish: Verbal Mimicry of Birdsong

TLDR
As artifacts of human creativity in response to nature, warblish and the other methods of birdsong imitation described here merit interdisciplinary inquiry.

The Spotted Nightjar Calls When Dingo Pups Are Born: Ecological and Social Indicators In Central Australia

TLDR
This study explores the basis of indicator events, finding both an ecological and cultural basis for many signs and draws attention to the significance of the indicator relationship in terms of how people make sense of co-occurring events around them.

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 28 REFERENCES

THE BIRDS AS INDICATORS OF THE INVISIBLE WORLD: ETHNO-ORNITHOLOGY OF THE MBUTI HUNTER-GATHERERS

The relationship of the birds with Mbuti hunter-gatherers is described and analyzed. A total of 115 types of birds were observed in the Ituri Forest of the Congo Basin. Vernacular names, practical

The Utilitarian Factor in Folk Biological Classification

This paper argues that ethnoscientists interested in folk biological classification have paid insufficient attention to the practical significance of such systems of cultural knowledge in their

Contested Knowledge, Contingent Classification: Animals in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea

New Guinea highlanders appear to conceive of animal taxonomy in a way that is simultaneously familiar to a scientist, yet different. This is often attributed to interaction between natural ecology,

Nage Birds: Classification and symbolism among an eastern Indonesian people

TLDR
This book discusses birds in Myth and Metaphor, birds as Omens and Taboo, and the story of Tupa Lelu, or How Birds of Prey Became Chicken Thieves.

Ethno-Ornithology of the Tembo in Eastern DRC (Former Zaire): Part one, Kalehe Zone

Ethno-ornithology of the Tembo people, agriculturalists of Eastern DRC (Democratic Republic of Congo; former Zaire) was studied to understand man-bird interrelations in the tropical rain forest. On

UTILITARIAN/ADAPTATIONIST EXPLANATIONS OF FOLK BIOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION: SOME CAUTIONARY NOTES

Attempts to explain the complexity of folk biological classification systems may benefit from utilitarian or adaptationist arguments, focusing on the utilitarian or adaptive value of the behavioral

ADDITIONS TO THE BIRDS OF BILIGIRI RANGASWAMY TEMPLE WILDLIFE SANCTUARY, WESTERN GHATS, INDIA

Biligiri Rangaswamy Temple Wildlife Sanctuary (BRT WLS) is located in the middle of the bridge between Eastern and Western Ghats. There are about 245 birds in the Sanctuary. The present study was

Variable constructs in Nuaulu zoological classification

with reference to multilingual situations (see e.g. Tyler, 1969c, pp. 433-434; 1969d, pp. 487-503; Swartz, I960; Frake, 1964; Moerman, 1971; Gumperz, 1969), there appears to have been little

Experimental analysis of nature-nurture interactions.

  • R. Wyman
  • Psychology
    Journal of experimental zoology. Part A, Comparative experimental biology
  • 2005
TLDR
The presumed opposition of nature and nurture has been a major concern of western civilization since its beginnings and scientists recast the debate as instinct vs. learning, bitterly argued between behaviorists and ethologists.

A mutual understanding? Interspecific responses by birds to each other's aerial alarm calls

TLDR
The results demonstrate, after at least 50 years of interest in the subject, that there can be mutual responses to aerial alarm calls between species.