• Corpus ID: 3674754

Solanaceae IV: Atropa belladonna, deadly nightshade.

@article{Lee2007SolanaceaeIA,
  title={Solanaceae IV: Atropa belladonna, deadly nightshade.},
  author={M. R. Lee},
  journal={The journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh},
  year={2007},
  volume={37 1},
  pages={
          77-84
        }
}
  • M. R. Lee
  • Published 2007
  • History
  • The journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
The Deadly Nightshade, Atropa belladonna, is a plant surrounded by myth, fear and awe. In antiquity, the Greeks and the Romans knew that it contained a deadly poison. In medieval times, it was widely used by witches, sorcerors and professional poisoners. Linnaeus later codified its remarkable properties as the genus Atropa, the Fate that slits the thin spun life and the species belladonna because of its power to dilate the pupils. In the 1830s, the pure alkaloid I-atropine was isolated from the… 

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