Soilborne ascospores and pycnidiospores of Leptosphaeria maculans can contribute significantly to blackleg disease epidemiology in oilseed rape (Brassica napus) in Western Australia

@article{Li2011SoilborneAA,
  title={Soilborne ascospores and pycnidiospores of Leptosphaeria maculans can contribute significantly to blackleg disease epidemiology in oilseed rape (Brassica napus) in Western Australia},
  author={Hua Li and Krishnapillai Sivasithamparam and Martin J Barbetti},
  journal={Australasian Plant Pathology},
  year={2011},
  volume={36},
  pages={439-444}
}
Blackleg disease (Leptosphaeria maculans) causes severe yield losses in oilseed rape (Brassica napus) worldwide from the development of cankers in the crown of the plant and, in Western Australia, also from seedling death following early infections. Although most aspects of the epidemiology of this disease are relatively well described, the role of soilborne ascospores and pycnidiospores in the disease epidemic remains unknown. Three separate experiments were undertaken to define the role for… CONTINUE READING