Sociosexually unrestricted parents have more sons: a further application of the generalized Trivers-Willard hypothesis (gTWH).

@article{Kanazawa2009SociosexuallyUP,
  title={Sociosexually unrestricted parents have more sons: a further application of the generalized Trivers-Willard hypothesis (gTWH).},
  author={Satoshi Kanazawa and P{\'e}ter Apari},
  journal={Annals of human biology},
  year={2009},
  volume={36 3},
  pages={
          320-30
        }
}
BACKGROUND The generalized Trivers-Willard hypothesis (gTWH) proposes that parents who possess any heritable trait which increases male reproductive success at a greater rate than female reproductive success in a given environment will have a higher-than-expected offspring sex ratio, and parents who possess any heritable trait which increases the female reproductive success at a greater rate than male reproductive success in a given environment will have a lower-than-expected offspring sex… CONTINUE READING
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