Socioeconomic status and genetic influences on cognitive development

@article{Figlio2017SocioeconomicSA,
  title={Socioeconomic status and genetic influences on cognitive development},
  author={David N. Figlio and Jeremy Freese and Krzysztof Karbownik and Jeffrey Roth},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  year={2017},
  volume={114},
  pages={13441 - 13446}
}
Significance A prominent hypothesis in the study of intelligence is that genetic influences on cognitive abilities are larger for children raised in more advantaged environments. Evidence to date has been mixed, with some indication that the hypothesized pattern may hold in the United States but not elsewhere. We conducted the largest study to date using matched birth and school administrative records from the socioeconomically diverse state of Florida, and we did not find evidence for the… Expand

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