Sociobiology of slave-making ants

@article{dEttorre2001SociobiologyOS,
  title={Sociobiology of slave-making ants},
  author={Patrizia d’Ettorre and Juergen Heinze},
  journal={acta ethologica},
  year={2001},
  volume={3},
  pages={67-82}
}
Abstract Social parasitism is the coexistence in the same nest of two species of social insects, one of which is parasitically dependent on the other. Though parasitism in general is known to be of crucial importance in the evolution of host species, social parasites, though intriguing, are often considered as a phenomenon of marginal interest and are typically not taken into account in reviews on parasitism. Nevertheless, social parasites are rather common in social bees, wasps, and ants and… 
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