Sociality, density-dependence and microclimates determine the persistence of populations suffering from a novel fungal disease, white-nose syndrome.

@article{Langwig2012SocialityDA,
  title={Sociality, density-dependence and microclimates determine the persistence of populations suffering from a novel fungal disease, white-nose syndrome.},
  author={Kate E. Langwig and Winifred F. Frick and Jason T. Bried and Alan C. Hicks and Thomas H. Kunz and A. Marm Kilpatrick},
  journal={Ecology letters},
  year={2012},
  volume={15 9},
  pages={
          1050-7
        }
}
Disease has caused striking declines in wildlife and threatens numerous species with extinction. Theory suggests that the ecology and density-dependence of transmission dynamics can determine the probability of disease-caused extinction, but few empirical studies have simultaneously examined multiple factors influencing disease impact. We show, in hibernating bats infected with Geomyces destructans, that impacts of disease on solitary species were lower in smaller populations, whereas in… Expand
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