Social users of alcohol and cannabis who detect substance-related changes in a change blindness paradigm report higher levels of use than those detecting substance-neutral changes

@article{Jones2002SocialUO,
  title={Social users of alcohol and cannabis who detect substance-related changes in a change blindness paradigm report higher levels of use than those detecting substance-neutral changes},
  author={Ben C. Jones and Barry T. Jones and Laura Blundell and Gillian Bruce},
  journal={Psychopharmacology},
  year={2002},
  volume={165},
  pages={93-96}
}
Abstract Rationale. Understanding the cognitions underpinning substance use has stalled using the Stroop paradigm. Objective. To employ a novel version of the flicker paradigm for induced change blindness to independently compare information processing biases in social users of alcohol and cannabis. Method. Alcohol and cannabis experiments were independently run. In both, participants were asked to view successively and repeatedly on a monitor two versions of a visual scene (an original and a… 

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