Social support drives female dominance in the spotted hyaena

@article{Vullioud2018SocialSD,
  title={Social support drives female dominance in the spotted hyaena},
  author={Colin Vullioud and Eve Davidian and Bettina Wachter and François Rousset and Alexandre Courtiol and Oliver P. H{\"o}ner},
  journal={Nature Ecology \& Evolution},
  year={2018},
  volume={3},
  pages={71-76}
}
Identifying how dominance within and between the sexes is established is pivotal to understanding sexual selection and sexual conflict. In many species, members of one sex dominate those of the other in one-on-one interactions. Whether this results from a disparity in intrinsic attributes, such as strength and aggressiveness, or in extrinsic factors, such as social support, is currently unknown. We assessed the effects of both mechanisms on dominance in the spotted hyaena (Crocuta crocuta), a… 
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