Social spider defense against kleptoparasitism

@article{Cangialosi2004SocialSD,
  title={Social spider defense against kleptoparasitism},
  author={Karen R. Cangialosi},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={27},
  pages={49-54}
}
  • K. Cangialosi
  • Published 1 July 1990
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
SummaryBecause of the large amount of webbing they provide, social spider colonies often host other satellite spider species referred to as kleptoparasites or food stealers. Such kleptoparasites may take advantage of increased prey capture rates associated with large spider aggregations. This study investigated the relationship between a cooperatively social spider species, Anelosimus eximius (Araneae: Theridiidae), which lives in the undergrowth of tropical rainforests in Peru, and its… 

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A redescription and phylogenetic analysis corroborate the placement of this species in Theridion, indicating that sociality has evolved independently in at least three theridiid genera.

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Collective Defense of Aphis nerii and Uroleucon hypochoeridis (Homoptera, Aphididae) against Natural Enemies

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Obs observations of natural aphid colonies revealed that a collective twitching and kicking response (CTKR) was frequently evoked during oviposition attempts of the parasitoid wasp Aphidius colemani and during attacks of aphidophagous larvae, suggesting that visual signals in combination with twitching-related substrate vibrations may play an important role in synchronising defense among members of a colony.

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