Social semantics: altruism, cooperation, mutualism, strong reciprocity and group selection

@article{West2007SocialSA,
  title={Social semantics: altruism, cooperation, mutualism, strong reciprocity and group selection},
  author={S. A. West and Ashleigh S. Griffin and Andy Gardner},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2007},
  volume={20}
}
From an evolutionary perspective, social behaviours are those which have fitness consequences for both the individual that performs the behaviour, and another individual. Over the last 43 years, a huge theoretical and empirical literature has developed on this topic. However, progress is often hindered by poor communication between scientists, with different people using the same term to mean different things, or different terms to mean the same thing. This can obscure what is biologically… 
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