Social resilience in online communities: the autopsy of friendster

@inproceedings{Garca2013SocialRI,
  title={Social resilience in online communities: the autopsy of friendster},
  author={David Garc{\'i}a and Pavlin Mavrodiev and Frank Schweitzer},
  booktitle={COSN '13},
  year={2013}
}
We empirically analyze five online communities: Friendster, Livejournal, Facebook, Orkut, and Myspace, to study how social networks decline. We define social resilience as the ability of a community to withstand changes. We do not argue about the cause of such changes, but concentrate on their impact. Changes may cause users to leave, which may trigger further leaves of others who lost connection to their friends. This may lead to cascades of users leaving. A social network is said to be… 

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