Social relationships among adult female baboons

@article{Seyfarth1976SocialRA,
  title={Social relationships among adult female baboons},
  author={Robert M. Seyfarth},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1976},
  volume={24},
  pages={917-938}
}
  • R. Seyfarth
  • Published 1 November 1976
  • Psychology
  • Animal Behaviour

Social Relationships Among Adult Male and Female Baboons. Ii. Behaviour Throughout the Female Reproductive Cycle

TLDR
Data suggest that male-female relationships are best understood not by examining sexual consortship alone but by considering sexual behaviour within the context of social interactions throughout all reproductive states.

The distribution of grooming and related behaviours among adult female vervet monkeys

THE STRUCTURE OF SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS AMONG FEMALE SAVANNA BABOONS IN MOREMI RESERVE, BOTSWANA

TLDR
The effects of maternal kinship, reciprocity, and dominance rank on the social relationships of female baboons in a well-habituated, free-ranging group in the Okavango Delta of Botswana are examined.

Female dominance and female social relationships among yellow baboons (Papio hamadryas cynocephalus)

TLDR
It is concluded that females' dominance rankings are not good predictors of either proximity partner or grooming partner preferences and that the presence of an infant does have a significant impact on grooming partner preference in this population of feral yellow baboons.

Male rank and reproductive activity in Savanna baboons

TLDR
It is concluded that male rank is an unreliable predictor of male reproductive activity among adult male baboons.

Styles of male social behavior and their endocrine correlates among high‐ranking wild baboons

TLDR
Study of dominance rank and physiology among male olive baboons living freely in a national park in Africa finds that these endocrine features are not, in fact, purely markers of social dominance; instead, they are found only among dominant males with particular stylistic traits of social behavior.

Female–female aggression around mating: an extra cost of sociality in a multimale primate society

TLDR
The results provide most support for the mating competition hypothesis: aggression increases with the number of swollen females in a group, swollen females receiving the most aggression, and mate-guarded swollen females receive more aggression than when unguarded.
...

References

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TLDR
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The development of social structure in free-ranging rhesus monkeys.

TLDR
Comparison between results and those on a more mature population of free-ranging monkeys at Cayo Santiago indicates that the absence of kinship ties in the new colony may have been the cause of the instability observed.

SOME ASPECTS OF PARENT-OFFSPRING AND SIBLING RELATIONS IN A GROUP OF RHESUS MONKEYS, WITH A DISCUSSION OF GROOMING.

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TLDR
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  • 1972
TLDR
Implants of oestradiol induced turgescence of the sexual skin of ovariectomised baboons and stimulated mounting by males when the females were released into a study troop and there was no dose-response relationship between oestrogen and behaviour.