Social organization of woodchucks (Marmota monax)

@article{Meier2004SocialOO,
  title={Social organization of woodchucks (Marmota monax)},
  author={Paul T. Meier},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={31},
  pages={393-400}
}
  • P. T. Meier
  • Published 1 December 1992
  • Psychology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
SummaryThe social organization of woodchucks (Marmota monax) in southeast Ohio was studied at two sites, at one for two 2 years (1979–1980) and the other for 3 years (1981–1983). Spatial organization was determined by trapping and radio tracking. The home ranges of adult females did not overlap in the early spring but during late spring and summer there was some overlap (<10%) as females expanded their home ranges. Adult females tended to occupy the same home range in consecutive years. Some… 

Social Organization in Woodchucks (Marmota monax) and its Relationship to Growing Season

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Data was collected on interaction rates, timing of dispersal, and body mass of woodchucks in southern Maine, and comparative data from the literature was gathered to investigate relationships between social organization and growing season.

INTRASEXUAL TERRITORIALITY IN WOODCHUCKS (MARMOTA MONAX)

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The spacing system of a high-density population of Marmota monax in southern Maine exhibited intrasexual territoriality, and Philopatry and timing of dispersal also vary in this species and have implications for the evolution of sociality.

Spatial Organization in Female Golden-Mantled Ground Squirrels

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The results provide support for the classification of golden-mantled ground squirrels as asocial but suggest that the expression of territoriality and early dispersal may be variable.

INTRASEXUAL TERRITORIALITY IN WOODCHUCKS

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The spacing system of a high-density population of Marmota monax in southern Maine exhibited intrasexual territoriality, and males had larger home ranges than females, and home range sizes varied over time, perhaps in response to resources.

MARMOTA CA UDATA A UREA)

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While general predictions about sociality in marmots were upheld, an economic model combining defense costs and resource distribution failed to explain the mechanism of social monogamy.

Mating system and paternity in woodchucks (Marmota monax)

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The mating system of woodchucks (M. monax), whose social organization lies at the opposite end of the continuum from alpine marmots, is described, which could be classified as genetically promiscuous.

Survival, Habitat Selection, and Body Condition of the Woodchuck (Marmota monax) across an Urban-Rural Gradient

TLDR
Data on body condition and adipose composition, although preliminary, suggested a possible mechanism for variation in overwinter survival across the urban-rural gradient, and indicated no clear relationship between woodchuck ecology and urbanization level within the study area.

Genetic relatedness and space use in a behaviorally flexible species of marmot, the woodchuck (Marmota monax)

  • C. R. Maher
  • Environmental Science
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2009
TLDR
Woodchucks displayed spatial patterns seen in other, more social species of ground-dwelling sciurids, including high population density associated with the study site's location within a suburban environment, high dispersal costs, and abundant food.

Capybara social structure and dispersal patterns: variations on a theme

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The social structure and dynamics of capybaras across much of their geographic range are reviewed, including in 1 low-density location dispersal appears to occur in groups of both sexes, whereas in another location, where density is higher, males disperse and females are philopatric.

Yellow-bellied Marmots (Marmota flaviventris) Hibernate Socially

TLDR
It is concluded that yellow-bellied marmots hibernate socially, a result consistent with a previous report based on 1 colony site and which suggests the effects of global climate change are affecting hibernation patterns.

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