Social organization of the spotted hyaena Crocuta crocuta. II. Dominance and reproduction

@article{Frank1986SocialOO,
  title={Social organization of the spotted hyaena Crocuta crocuta. II. Dominance and reproduction},
  author={Laurence G. Frank},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1986},
  volume={34},
  pages={1510-1527}
}
  • L. Frank
  • Published 1 October 1986
  • Biology
  • Animal Behaviour
Abstract A 4-year study of the social organization of spotted hyaenas in a clan of 60–80 individuals showed that there is a separate dominance hierarchy within each sex. One female and her descendants dominated all others; matrilineal rankings were stable over time because maternal rank is inherited. Cubs of higher ranking females were able to feed at kills in competition with adults more successfully than other cubs, and male offspring of the alpha female were the only males able to dominate… Expand
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TLDR
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Behavioral processes and costs of co-existence in female spotted hyenas: a life history perspective
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This study shows that the frequency-dependent outcome of behavioral processes can be a key determinant of maternal reproductive success in social carnivores and have a profound influence on the reproductive career prospects of offspring. Expand
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Social organization of the spotted hyaena (Crocuta crocuta). I. Demography
A 4-year field study of one group of 60–80 spotted hyaenas (Crocuta crocuta) in Kenya's Masai Mara National Reserve has revealed a form of social system undescribed among carnivores but common amongExpand
Inter-troop transfer and inbreeding avoidance in Papio anubis
Abstract In three adjacent troops of olive baboons (Papio anubis), all males emigrated from their natal troop. There is evidence that the costs of inbreeding depression may exceed those ofExpand
Maternal rank and offspring rank in vervet monkeys: An appraisal of the mechanisms of rank acquisition
Abstract In two troops of vervet monkeys ( Cercopithecus aethiops sabaeus ) in Barbados, maternal rank predicted the outcomes of 85.5% of all dyadic aggressive interactions between juveniles andExpand
Social dominance and feeding patterns of spotted hyaenas
TLDR
Feeding rates at small carcasses in the Namib Desert are approximately equal to those reported in East Africa, but at large carcasses Namibia Desert spotted hyaenas feed significantly more slowly, and lower-ranking individuals eventually gain access to large carcass but are excluded from smaller ones. Expand
Long-Term Consistency of Dominance Relations Among Female Baboons (Papio cynocephalus)
At maturity, female baboons in the Amboseli National Park of Kenya generally attain a rank position among adults near to that of their mothers. However, the age of a female's mother and theExpand
Reproduction in the Spotted Hyaena, Crocuta crocuta (Erxleben)
From time immemorial it has been known that there is something peculiar about the sexual anatomy and physiology of the spotted hyaena. The writers of antiquity relate the legend that this animal isExpand
Inferring kinship from behaviour: Maternity determinations in yellow baboons
TLDR
A comparison of the relationships of six three-year-old yellow baboon (Papio cynocephalus) females with 14 adult females showed that when a juvenile's mother was living she could easily be identified from behavioural data. Expand
Mating relationships and breeding suppression in the dwarf mongoose
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Dwarf mongooses live in packs containing a dominant breeding pair that produces litters at regular intervals, usually three times per year, and the alpha pair are likely to be the parents of the great majority of young born in the pack. Expand
Sexual dimorphism of the phallus in spotted hyaena (Crocuta crocuta).
The weight of the skinned phallus and the diameter of its shaft and glans did not differ significantly in the two sexes of spotted hyaena, but phallus length was greater in males. The urethra of theExpand
An Ecological Model of Female-Bonded Primate Groups
TLDR
A model is presented to account for the evolution of FB groups in terms of ecological pressures on female relationships and suggests that relationships in most FB groups are ultimately related to feeding competition. Expand
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