Social networks and health: a systematic review of sociocentric network studies in low- and middle-income countries.

@article{Perkins2015SocialNA,
  title={Social networks and health: a systematic review of sociocentric network studies in low- and middle-income countries.},
  author={Jessica M Perkins and S V Subramanian and Nicholas A. Christakis},
  journal={Social science & medicine},
  year={2015},
  volume={125},
  pages={60-78}
}
In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), naturally occurring social networks may be particularly vital to health outcomes as extended webs of social ties often are the principal source of various resources. Understanding how social network structure, and influential individuals within the network, may amplify the effects of interventions in LMICs, by creating, for example, cascade effects to non-targeted participants, presents an opportunity to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of… CONTINUE READING
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